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Sharyn Morrow, CPACC Posts

Roundup of Recent A11Y Resources

For the past few years, I’ve been using Firefox’s pocket app. It’s handy to keep track of articles, posts, and resources I may not have time to explore in the moment, but want to revisit later. I use pocket a lot. From my both mobile and my laptop. Thankfully, tags can be employed so it’s easier to sort by topic later. One tag I bust out a lot is a11y, naturally. Here are some noteworthy accessibility-related posts I’ve saved recently.

That last one is particularly good if you are unfamiliar with Christine Miserandino’s Spoon Theory. And may be relevant to even more of us since the pandemic started.

Illustration of 11 grayed out spoons with one white spoon
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A Personal Introduction into Accessibility

The User Experience Professionals Association of Minnesota (UXPA-MN) is a community of user-centered advocates. I’m a member and a fan. Their April event is being held this Thursday.

Please join us at UXPA for a conversation on accessibility with our wonderful guests who are passionate and seasoned a11y advocates.

We will talk about the Journey from UX to a11y – infusing a11y into daily life as a UX professional. Usability and accessibility are not separated from each other, and as designers we need to learn to be more inclusive in the design process. We will also touch on the future of accessibility, a11y and UX ways of working, and better ways to measure a11y.

Minnesota UXPA

Follow this link to register for the event.

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Cognitive Accessibility

I’ve been following self-declared “Accessibility Old Timer” Gareth Ford Williams for a while now. The deeper I get into my accessibility journey, the more time I spend thinking about cognitive accessibility. In particular, how we can build digital experiences without barriers for neurodivergent folks like myself and my son. Gareth has put together this helpful guide: A Cognitive perspective on UX Design Principles, which includes a neurodivergent perspective with links to relevant guidance and resources. Recently, the W3C also put out the web version of Making Content Usable for People with Cognitive and Learning Disabilities. Depending on how neurodiversity is defined, between 10 and 30 percent of the population has a neurodivergent trait. Cognitive design principles can lead to better user experiences for all, without leaving so many people behind.

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